Though the waterfall
Ceased its flowing long ago,
And its sound is stilled,
Yet, in name it ever flows,
And in fame may yet be heard.
~ Fujiwara no Kinto

Patti invited bloggers to explore the movement of objects or people. Since it is a bit too hot this weekend to go on a photo walkabout, I wandered through some old files. I hope you enjoy.

There is a unique joy within those moments when something flashes with an invitation to pause, to become acquainted, to compose, and to whisper, “Please remain as such while I set up my camera.”

To engage with what is as it is in the moment…one definition of contemplative photography.

Fujifilm X-T4 f/4 1/10s 120mm 160 ISO, editing Snapseed

A. Karr and M. Wood (The Practice of Contemplative Photography) notes that contemplative photography begins with “the flash of perception.”  

In the flash of perception…there is a space for things to come to you. Experience is definite, because there is no doubt about what you are seeing… Whatever it is, it is here, and there is no doubt involved, no shakiness.  The nature of perception is sharp, with a brilliant, clear quality.  The flash of perception is a moment of seeing that is one-pointed, stable, and free from distraction.  Experience is not diffused or scattered or moving. It is direct and in focus. It is stable because it is not tossed about by winds of thought or emotion. There is a stillness and roundedness as awareness remains with perception.

Visit Slow Shutter Speed to join this week’s lens-artist’s photo challenge: What’s your photographic groove?

Images that have currently survived this photographer’s ongoing critique of her creative efforts.

Morning’s moon at Snowy Range National Park … landscape

Coffee and me… still life

Reed Reflections at Shield Pond … minimalism

Playground slide at Spring Creek Park … abstract

Hop on over to (Travel with Me) and join this week’s photo challenge: picking favorites

tethered to home...

“Sutcliffe rarely left Whitby [a port and resort community on the Yorkshire coast], where his portrait studio kept him busy, and said that he was ‘tethered for the greater part of each year by a chain, at most only a mile or two long.’  To most modern photographers this would seem a crippling restriction, but Sutcliffe gradually realized that it was an asset to him as a photographer since it forced him to concentrate on the transitory effects that could transform familiar scenes. …photographers should always aim for something more than ‘mere postcard records of facts.’ ‘By waiting and watching for accidental effects of fog, sunshine or cloud,’ he advised, ‘it is generally possible to get an original rendering of any place.  If we only get what any one can get at any time, our labour is wasted; a mere record of facts should never satisfy us.”

cited: Frank Meadow Sutcliffe, The History of Photography Series, p 8

Me and my Nikon alongside the Cache la Poudre River … the river’s name refers to an incident in the 1820s when French trappers buried part of their gunpowder along the banks of the river during a snowstorm.

Images submitted in response to Slow Shutter Speed’s challenge: local vistas