weekly photo challenge: the world through your eyes

photo challenges, photography, poetry, spirituality, Uncategorized

With one who does not speak his every thought

I spent a pleasant evening. ~ Hyakuchi*

worldthroughmyeyes2

Things wabi-sabi have a vague, blurry, or attenuated quality—as things do as they approach nothingness (or come out of it).  One-hard edges take on a soft pale glow. Once-substantial materiality appears almost sponge-like. Once-bright saturated colors fade into muddy earth tones or the smoky hues of dawn and dust.  Wabi-sabi comes in an infinite spectrum of grays…**

This week’s  WordPress.com Weekly Photo Challenge submission:  a barn in southeastern Wyoming

sources:

*The Moon in the Pines

Trans:  Jonathan Clements

**Wabi-Sabi  for Artist, designers, Poets, & Philosophers

Leonard Koren

window of understanding

art, photography, spirituality, Uncategorized

window

The remarkable thing about deja vu, or other vivid experiences of recollection,

is that they are vested with significances that we cannot put into words.

At an earlier time, whatever happened might have seemed important, or might not.

But the recollection is charged with relevance, and tears flow for no reason.

Robert Aitken, A Zen Wave

weekly photo challenge: curves

art, photo challenges, photography, spirituality, Uncategorized

Share a picture of CURVES and explain why you chose that picture!

Gramophone

Gramophone

Blue Bird

Blue Bird

‘A photograph,’ it has been said, ‘shows the art of nature rather than the art of the artist.’  This is mere nonsense, as the same remark might be applied equally well to all the fine arts. Nature does not jump into the camera, focus itself, expose itself, develop itself, and print itself. On the contrary, the artist, using photography as a medium, chooses his subject, selects his details, generalizes the whole in the way we have shown, and thus gives his view of nature. This is not copying or imitating nature, but interpreting her, and this is all any artist can do. ~Henry Emerson *

cited in:

Tao of Photography  Seeing beyond Seeing

Philippe L. Gross and S. I. Shapiro