six word saturday: arisings and ceasings within each ksana

The arising and ceasing within a ksana* occurs very rapidly. During any particular moment, we see flowers as red and leaves as green. In reality, they are constantly changing from ksana to ksana, and after a while, they will wilt. Within each ksana, they are perpetually growing and wilting. 

In this world, how can there be any flowers and grass that will never wilt? How can there be any tables that will not be subjected to destruction? Because all phenomena and existences are arising from ksana to ksana, all phenomena and existence are therefore ceasing from ksana to ksana. There is a saying, “When a young man snaps his fingers, sixty-three ksanas have gone by.” Time goes by very fast. Youth can disappear in a flash. A ksana is indeed an extremely brief and short span of time.

*A ksana is a tiny unit of time, approximately one seventy-fifth of a second. It is an imperceptibly small amount of time, and all kinds of things happen within the space of a ksana that elude our conscious awareness. For example, it is said there are 900 arisings and ceasings within each ksana. I suspect the number 900 is not meant to be precise but rather is a poetic way of saying “a lot.”

Six Word Saturday is sponsored by: Travel with Intent

Cited: http://www.ibps.org/english/master/Time%20and%20Space.html

3 Comments

  1. I heard a fascinating discussion about time on NPR recently. The guest was discussing how time passes, which it really doesn’t, because there never is a now, only the past and the future.

    1. Thank you for visiting and sharing your thoughts. It is a challenge to understand “time and space” … the discussion of there never is a now makes sense to me if I consider the lapse between the actual sunrise and when I see the sunrise. I think we experience life as it was due to the time between sense contact and brain processing. I would have enjoyed hearing this NPR program.

      1. I wish I could remember more about it. NOw I’ starting to wonder if I have it backward and there is only the present. 🙂 🙂 Obviously my past has slipped away.

Comments are closed.