dogwood photography’s photo challenge: Inspiration – the elements

Week 39 Inspiration: The Elements (Earth, Fire, Wind, Rain, and Spirit. Find inspiration in the elements of our world.)

Nikon D750 f/5.6 1/400 250mm 800 ISO

Image submitted in response to Dogwood Photography’s annual 52-week photography challenge.

Advertisements

lens-artists photo challenge: countryside

Sony REX-5N f/9 1/160 70mm

Ten years it took

To build my little cottage.

Now the cool wind inhabits half of it

And the rest is filled with moonlight.

There is no place left for the mountain and the stream

So I guess they will have to stay outside.

~Song Sun (1493-1583) Trans: V O Baron & C S Park

Wyoming landscape and poetry submitted in response to Amy’s (The World is a Book) lens-artists photo challenge: countryside and/or small towns.

i yearn for a tranquil moment

I yearn for a tranquil moment
To be out upon the sea of harmony,
In that enchanted boat.
Oh, boatman, do you know my heart?

~The Sarashina Diary (Diaries of Court Ladies of Old Japan)

A small section of the Pacific Ocean along the Oregon coastline (2010) and a poem from The Sarashina Diary submitted in response to Travel with Intent’s six word challenge.

forests, sea ice, soil, rain, ecosystems, sentient beings

Nikon D750 f/5.3 1/400s 105mm 1250 ISO

The heat of a warming planet, like an artist’s palette knife on a canvas, etches its way across Western forests, slowly altering ecosystems that have flourished for centuries. cited: Climate change is transforming Western forests. Mark Jaffe, The Colorado Sun July 25, 2019

  • “As ecosystems change, there are going to be winners and losers,” said Thomas Veblen, a biogeographer and distinguished professor at the University of Colorado. “The regulator function of the forest could diminish … leading to more runoff and flash floods. With a reduction of the forest canopy, we are going to see the potential for greater erosion. The question is how much of the forest will fail to regenerate.”

Coasts, oceans, ecosystems, weather and human health all face impacts from climate change, and now valuable soils may also be affected. Climate change may reduce the ability of soils to absorb water in many parts of the world, according to a new study. And that could have serious implications for groundwater supplies, food production and security, stormwater runoff, biodiversity and ecosystems. cited: Climate change may cut soil’s ability to absorb water. Rutgers University, Science Daily, September 11, 2019

  • … a study published in the journal Nature last year showing that regional increases in precipitation due to climate change may lead to less water infiltration, more runoff and erosion, and greater risk of flash flooding.

The Arctic Ocean could become ice-free in the summer in the next 20 years due to a natural, long-term warming phase in the tropical Pacific that adds to human-caused warming, according to a new study: cited: Ice-free Arctic summers could happen on earlier side of predictions. American Geophysical Union, Science Daily, February 27, 2019.

  • There are different climate models used by researchers to predict when the first ice-free Arctic September will occur. Most models project there will fewer than 1 million square kilometers of sea ice around the middle of this century, but projections of when that will occur vary within 20-year windows due to natural climate fluctuations.
Nikon D750 f/3.2 1/4,000 40mm

A global study has found a paradox: our water supplies are shrinking at the same time as climate change is generating more intense rain. And the culprit is the drying of soils, say researchers, pointing to a world where drought-like conditions will become the new normal, especially in regions that are already dry. cited: The long dry: Why the world’s water supply is shrinking. University of New South Wales, Science Daily, December 13, 2018.

  • “It’s a double whammy,” said Sharma. “Less water is ending up where we can store it for later use. At the same time, more rain is overwhelming drainage infrastructure in towns and cities, leading to more urban flooding.”

dogwood photography’s photo challenge: composition – rule of odds

Week 38 Composition: Rule of Odds (The rule of odds is easy enough to understand and employ. So use the rule of odds in an Urbanscape/Architecture photo.)

Nikon D750 f/3.5 1/500s 28mm

Image submitted in response to Dogwood Photography’s annual 52-week photography challenge.

can you hear mother earth?

cited: Can you Hear Mother Earth

“Many of us have forgotten that we are one with the Earth. The Earth is not a separate entity from us. We are part of the Earth, and the Earth is part of us. The Earth is not a resource for us to exploit at our will. The Earth is us; we are intimately interconnected with the Earth, just as we inter-are with all other species on Earth, too. Our spiritual ancestors have taught us about the law of interdependent co-arising: this is because that is. We are here because the Earth is here. All species are our brothers and sisters; we are all children of the Earth.

Nikon D750 f/5.6 1/400s 300mm 200 ISO

“When we see our deep interbeing with the Earth and with all species, we will see what to do—and what to stop doing—to help the situation. We will have the clarity and compassion we need to help change the situation, so that a future can be possible for us all.

“…Mother Earth has been crying out for so long. She has never stopped giving us whatever we needed: food, water and shelter, allowing us to flourish in her abundance, never asking for anything in return. …”

~Sister Chan Khong “Can You Hear Mother Earth?” July 2016 Plum Village

UN Secretary-General at UN Climate Change Conference

are you ready…

Fighting climate breakdown is about much more than emissions and scientific metrics – it’s about fighting for a just and sustainable world that works for all of us.

https://globalclimatestrike.net

On Sept. 20-27, climate action organizers are planning a Global Climate Strike, with hopes that massive and consistent turnout will make a difference. If you’d like to join the 2019 Global Climate Strike, there are lots of ways you can get involved. And if there isn’t a strike planned in your city, the organizers want to help you plan one yourself. 

“The climate crisis is an emergency but we’re not acting like it,” the strike’s official website reads. “People everywhere are at risk if we let oil, coal and gas companies continue to pour more fuel on the fire.” And yes, though past strikes have focused on students, adults are welcome and absolutely encouraged to take part, too.