tethered to home...

“Sutcliffe rarely left Whitby [a port and resort community on the Yorkshire coast], where his portrait studio kept him busy, and said that he was ‘tethered for the greater part of each year by a chain, at most only a mile or two long.’  To most modern photographers this would seem a crippling restriction, but Sutcliffe gradually realized that it was an asset to him as a photographer since it forced him to concentrate on the transitory effects that could transform familiar scenes. …photographers should always aim for something more than ‘mere postcard records of facts.’ ‘By waiting and watching for accidental effects of fog, sunshine or cloud,’ he advised, ‘it is generally possible to get an original rendering of any place.  If we only get what any one can get at any time, our labour is wasted; a mere record of facts should never satisfy us.”

cited: Frank Meadow Sutcliffe, The History of Photography Series, p 8

Me and my Nikon alongside the Cache la Poudre River … the river’s name refers to an incident in the 1820s when French trappers buried part of their gunpowder along the banks of the river during a snowstorm.

Images submitted in response to Slow Shutter Speed’s challenge: local vistas

north shields pond

“…all critical intention is too far from me. With nothing can one approach a work of art so little as with critical words: they always come down to more or less happy misunderstandings. Things are not all so comprehensible and expressible as one would mostly have us believe, most events are inexpressible, taking place in a realm which no word has ever entered, and more inexpressible than all else are works of art, mysterious existences, the life of which, while ours passes away, endures.”

cited: Rainer Maria Rilke Letters to a Young Poet (Trans: M D Herter Norton)