black & white sunday: after and before

See and realize 

that this world

is not permanent.

Neither late nor early flowers

will remain.

~Ryokan (K Tanahashi: Sky Above, Great Wind)

beforeafterbbeforeaftera

An early summer morning in Poudre Canyon…submitted in response to Lost in Translation’s photo challenge

black & white sunday: playtime

the toy flute seller

clatters along…

plum blossoms

~Issa (www.haikuguy.om)

horsetooth

Six and one-half miles of Horsetooth Reservoir beckon visitors to come out and play! Surrounded by 1,900 acres of public lands, this reservoir has it all: fishing, boating, camping, picnicking, swimming, scuba diving, rock climbing, and water skiing.

 

black & white sunday: typical

from the tip

of the forest ranger’s broom. . . 

spring departs

~Issa (www.haikuguy.com)

medicinebow6web
Trees…Medicine Bow National Forest

Medicine Bow National Forest extends from north central Colorado to central Wyoming in the United States. The origin of  it’s name, Medicine Bow, is legendary. The generally accepted version is that the Native American tribes which inhabited southeastern Wyoming found mountain mahogany in one of the mountain valleys from which bows of exceptional quality were made. It became the custom of friendly tribes to assemble there annually and construct their weapons. At these assemblies, there were ceremonial powwows for the cure of disease which, in the hybrid speech that developed between the Indians and the early settlers, was known as making medicine. Eventually, the settlers associated the terms “making-medicine” and “making bow”, and Medicine Bow resulted as the name for the locality.

Hop on over to Lost in Translation to participate.