the wonder of

flowers opening

and birds singing:

prayers!

ka ya hiraki / nori toku tori no / kirabiyaka ~Gozan (1695-1733)*

oneshottwoways (1)

oneshottwoways

Visit WordPress for additional images submitted for this week’s photo challenge: one shot, two ways.

*This haikai trickery, a palindrome, reads the same forward and backward in kana (the Japanese alphabet)

 source: The Classic Tradition of haiku

Ed: Faubion Bowers

 

How invisibly

it changes color

in this world,

the flower

of the human heart.

                              ~Ono no Komachi*

 rose

our ordinary vision is limited, and…our conventional consensus of reality is not the only version of reality.

The complex multidimensionality of the modern world no doubt contributes to the constructive habit of the mind that, in its attempt to provide meaning, continually rearranges the world to fit individual needs.  The failure to recognize the constructive nature of the mind can be a major obstacle to artistry and creativity.  Conversely, understanding the constructive nature of the mind and reality can lead the way to Great Understanding in the art of photography and in the art of living. (61)**

 

sources:

*The Ink Dark Moon

Trans: Jane Hirshfield with Mariko Aratant

**Tao of Photography

Philippe L Gross & S.I. Shapiro

Share a picture of CURVES and explain why you chose that picture!

Gramophone
Gramophone
Blue Bird
Blue Bird

‘A photograph,’ it has been said, ‘shows the art of nature rather than the art of the artist.’  This is mere nonsense, as the same remark might be applied equally well to all the fine arts. Nature does not jump into the camera, focus itself, expose itself, develop itself, and print itself. On the contrary, the artist, using photography as a medium, chooses his subject, selects his details, generalizes the whole in the way we have shown, and thus gives his view of nature. This is not copying or imitating nature, but interpreting her, and this is all any artist can do. ~Henry Emerson *

cited in:

Tao of Photography  Seeing beyond Seeing

Philippe L. Gross and S. I. Shapiro