For the month of March, Paula (Lost in Translation) invites us to share images that illustrate one of five words – buffet, equine, gleaming, jagged, and lacustrine – within photos or photos that reflect each of the words.

I chose lacustrine which Merriam-Webster defines as: relating to, formed in, living in, or growing in lakes. The Roget’s International Thesaurus identifies lacustrine as: lake dweller, pile dweller or builder, laker.

Beginning with a poem written by Li Po:

The harvest moon is burning the waters of South Lake. Driving alone, I lean down to pick white lotus lilies.

Fierce desire pulls me… I yearn to tell them of my passion. Alas, my boat floats away at mercy of the moving current. My heart looks back in sadness.

~Li Po (cited: Trans: Anonymous. The Jade Flute. The Gutenberg Project)

And then a sharing of more music by Christine and the Queens…

May your spring be filled with days of laughter, pastel colors, awakening, family, friends, wellness, and hope.

The grass does not refuse
To flourish in the spring wind;
The leaves are not angry
At falling through the autumn sky.
Who with whip or spur
Can urge the feet of Time?
The things of the world flourish and decay,
Each at its own hour. ~LiPo

Trans: Arthur Waley, The Poet Li Po II. 26. The Sun Gutenberg.org

Nikon D750 f/5.6 1/80s 150mm 100 ISO

“The old man was thin and gaunt with deep wrinkles in the back of his neck. The brown blotches of the benevolent skin cancer the sun brings from its reflections on the tropic sea were on his cheeks. The blotches ran well down the sides of his face and his hands had the deep crease scars from handling heavy fish on the cords. But none of these scars were fresh. They were as old as erosions in a fishless desert.” ~Ernest Hemingway, The Old Man and the Sea

Opening a door of gratitude…

Reading an author’s words that have traveled through time and space.

Regret that dropping sun’s dusk;
Love this cold stream’s clearness.
Western beams follow flowing water;
Stir a ripple in wandering person’s mind.
Idly sing, gazing at cloudy moon;
Song done—sound of tall pines. ~Li Po*

Camping with family in the Snowies

Watching clouds drift over Cameron Peak

Watching children explore life through play

Waking to the silence of an early Spring’s snowfall

Being grateful for photographers inviting me to see the beauty of the blue and yellowish-brown colors of early spring

Driving through Wyoming on clear roadways

Seeing the smile of togetherness

Opening myself to the wisdom of words spoke by those younger than I

Sharing precious love-filled moments

This week Amy (The World is a Book) invited us to share precious moments we have had, before or during the pandemic.

*cited: Trans – Arthur Waley, The Poet Li Po Project Gutenberg ebook

O Sun that rose in the eastern corner of Earth,

Looking as though you came from under the ground,

When you crossed the sky and entered the deep sea,

Where did you stable your six dragon-steeds?

Now and of old your journeys have never ceased:

… ~Li Po (cited: gutenberg.org)

morning’s sun

I did not sleep, gazing at the moon all night 
But the dawning of the day 
Was in whiteness of hoar-frost.
~Izumi Shikibu (cited: Diaries of Court Ladies of Old Japan)

morning’s light

the early sun
reaches the valley…
roses of Sharon
~Issa (cited: haikuguy.com)

morning’s light

Anvica’s Gallery is hosting this week’s lens-artist’s photo challenge: the sun will come out tomorrow

The grass does not refuse

To flourish in the spring wind;

The leaves are not angry

At falling through the autumn sky.

Who with whip or spur

Can urge the feet of Time?

The things of the world flourish and decay,

Each at its own hour.

cited: The Poet Li Po (AD 701- 762) Trans: A Waley, Project Gutenberg

Autumn 2017
Autumn 2017

Autumn 2018

This week’s lens-artists photo challenge is sponsored by Patti.

XV. 2. A Dream of T’ien-mu Mountain

(Part of a Poem in Irregular Metre.)

On through the night I flew, high over the Mirror Lake. The lake-moon cast my shadow on the waves and travelled with me to the stream of Shan. The Lord Hsieh’s* lodging-place was still there. The blue waters rippled; the cry of the apes was shrill. I shod my feet with the shoes of the Lord Hsieh and “climbed to Heaven on a ladder of dark clouds.”** Half-way up, I saw the unrisen sun hiding behind the sea and heard the Cock of Heaven crowing in the sky. By a thousand broken paths I twisted and turned from crag to crag. My eyes grew dim. I clutched at the rocks, and all was dark.

The roaring of bears and the singing of dragons echoed amid the stones and streams. The darkness of deep woods made me afraid. I trembled at the storied cliffs.

The clouds hung dark, as though they would rain; the air was dim with the spray of rushing waters.

Lightning flashed: thunder roared. Peaks and ridges tottered and broke. Suddenly the walls of the hollow where I stood sundered with a crash, and I looked down on a bottomless void of blue, where the sun and moon gleamed on a terrace of silver and gold.

A host of Beings descended—Cloud-spirits, whose coats were made of rainbow and the horses they rode on were the winds.

Skyscape photography at sunset on 63rd day of self isolation Nikon D750 f/8 1/100s 190 mm 400 ISO edited: Capture One 20 & Photoshop

cited:

The Poet Li Po, by Arthur Waley and Bai Li The Project Gutenberg ebook

This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at http://www.gutenberg.org

Note:

*Hsieh Ling-yün (circa a.d. 400) was a famous mountain-climber who invented special mountain-climbing shoes.

**A quotation from one of Hsieh’s poems.

the distant parting

III. 1. The Distant Parting

“Long ago there were two queens* called Huang and Ying. And they stood on the shores of the Hsiao-hsiang, to the south of Lake Tung-t’ing. Their sorrow was deep as the waters of the Lake that go straight down a thousand miles. Dark clouds blackened the sun. Shōjō** howled in the mist and ghosts whistled in the rain. The queens said, ‘Though we speak of it we cannot mend it. High Heaven is secretly afraid to shine on our loyalty. But the thunder crashes and bellows its anger, that while Yao and Shun are here they should also be crowning Yü. When a prince loses his servants, the dragon turns into a minnow. When power goes to slaves, mice change to tigers.

“’Some say that Yao is shackled and hidden away, and that Shun has died in the fields.

“’But the Nine Hills of Deceit stand there in a row, each like each; and which of them covers the lonely bones of the Double-eyed One, our Master?’

“So the royal ladies wept, standing amid yellow clouds. Their tears followed the winds and waves, that never return. And while they wept, they looked out into the distance and saw the deep mountain of Tsang-wu.

“’The mountain of Tsang-wu shall fall and the waters of the Hsiang shall cease, sooner than the marks of our tears shall fade from these bamboo-leaves.’”

Cited:

The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Poet Li Po, by Arthur Waley and Bai Li This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at http://www.gutenberg.org

Notes:

*These queens were the daughters of the Emperor Yao, who gave them in marriage to Shun, and abdicated in his favour. Shun’s ministers conspired against him and set “the Great Yü” on the throne. A legend says that the spots on the bamboo-leaves which grow on the Hsiang River were caused by the tears of these two queens

**A kind of demon-monkey

Skyscape photography at sunset on 62nd day of self isolation – Nikon D750 f/8 1/640 90mm 400 ISO edited Capture One 20

The autumn wind is light,

The autumn moon is bright;

Fallen leaves gather but then disperse,

A cold crow roosts but again he stirs;

I think of you, and wonder when I’ll see you again?

At such an hour, on such a night, cruel is love’s pain?

~Li P0*

onsuchanight

*cited:

Li Po and Tu Fu

A Cooper

They ask me where’s the sense

on jasper mountains?

I laugh and don’t reply,

in heart’s own quiet:

Peach petals float their streams

away in secret

To other skies and earths

than those of mortals

~Li Po*

 

Resilient: multiple exposure images of the ever-changing landscape along Hwy. 287 between Laramie, Wyoming and Fort Collins, Colorado in combination with Li Po’s poem, In the Mountains: A reply to the Vulgar”  reflect the resilience of time and words.

*cited:

Li Po and Tu Fu

A Cooper

OLD FORM

Did Chuang Chou dream

he was a butterfly,

Or the butterfly

that it was Chuang Chou?

In one body’s

metamorphoses,

All is present,

infinite virtue!

betweennessblog

You surely know

Fairlyland’s oceans

Were made again

a limpid brooklet,

Down at Green Gate

the melon gardener

Once used to be

Marquis of Tung-ling?

Wealth and honour

were always like this:

You strive and strive,

but what do you seek?

                            ~Li Po*

Visit Dailypost at WordPress.com to view additional images

submitted for this week’s photo challenge: Work of Art.

 

cited:

*Li Po and Tu Fu

Trans:Arthur Cooper