wordless wednesday

Nikon D750 f/4.5 1/400s 52mm 100 ISO

Advertisements

katsura nobuko

Wild geese —

between their cries, a slice

of silence ~ Katsura Nobuko (M Ueda, Far Beyond the Field)

Nikon D750 f/5.6 1/2500 s 170 mm 1800 ISO

Katsura Nobuko was born Niwa Nobuko in Osaka, Japan on November 1, 1914. When she was five, she almost died of acute pneumonia. After graduating from Ootemae Girls’ High School, she began writing haiku when the poems in ‘Kikan’ (The flagship) magazine impressed her with their nontraditional style. She subsequently met the magazine’s editor, Hino Soojoo, and became his protege. Her marriage in 1939 changed her family name to Katsura, but her husband died two years later.

Childless, Nobuko returned to her mother’s home. On March 13, 1945, the home caught fire as the American planes bombed Osaka. Unable to put out the fire she gathered her haiku manuscripts before fleeing barefooted. It is said that when she was reunited with her mother, her mother – weeping – said, “You are safe — that’s all I care.” The rescued manuscripts were later published in her first volume, ‘Gekkoo shoo (Beams of the moon 1949).

Wall…street

Nikon D750 RX1003 f/8 1/1000s 320 ISO

The name of [Wall Street] originates from an actual wall that was built in the 17th century by the Dutch, who were living in what was then called New Amsterdam. The 12-foot (4 meter) wall was built to protect the Dutch against attacks from pirates and various Native American tribes, and to keep other potential dangers out of the establishment.

The area near the wall became known as Wall Street. Because of its prime location running the width of Manhattan between the East River and the Hudson River the road developed into one of the busiest trading areas in the entire city. Later, in 1699, the wall was dismantled by the British colonial government, but the name of the street stuck.

The financial industry got its official start on Wall Street on May 17, 1792. On that day, New York’s first official stock exchange was established by the signing of the Buttonwood Agreement. The agreement, so-called because it was signed under a buttonwood tree that early traders and speculators had previously gathered around to trade informally, gave birth to what is now the modern-day New York Stock Exchange NYSE.

Today, …in some circles, the term “Wall Street” has become a metaphor for corporate greed and financial mismanagement

cited: LiveScience : Denise Chow, Assistant Managing Editor | May 3, 2010 01:04pm ET

early dreams

Nikon D750 f/7.1 1/400s 85mm 1250 ISO

“Why should you care so much for Christminster?” she said, pensively. “Christminster cares nothing for you, poor dear!”

“Well, I do; I can’t help it. I love the place–although I know how it hates all men like me–the so-called Self-taught–how it scorns our labored acquisitions, when it should be the first to respect them; how it sneers at our false quantities and mispronunciations, when it should say, I see you want help, my poor friend!. . . Nevertheless, it is the centre of the universe to me, because of my early dream: and nothing can alter it. Perhaps it will soon wake up, and be generous. I pray so! . . . I should like to go back to live there–perhaps to die there! … ~Thomas Hardy (Jude the Obscure)

lens-artists photo challenge: reflections

Even into the mind always clouded with grief, 
There is cast the reflection of the bright moon ~
The Sarashina Diary (Diaries of Court Ladies of Old Japan)

North Shields Pond.…Nikon D750 f/7.1 1/400s 44mm 360 ISO

image submitted in response to Patti’s lens-artists photo challenge: reflections