Having drifted apart,

Why should folk

Despise each other? For

Not known and unknowing

Times there were once before…

                                                     ~The Monk Saigyo*

poppy
poppy

*cited:

http://www.temcauley.staff.shef.ac.uk

Relationships nourish the soul… often while I am out and about my imagination drifts away from the present as I begin to silently story the lives of others.  These two street images offer multiple stories about the dynamics of human interaction…with self, with others, with technology.

 

A dad with his son…playing ball?  Yet, while he is silently watching his son pick up the ball, there something about his stance that has me wonder if his mind is elsewhere.street

A solitary figure…waiting to meet someone while texting another or texting the one he is waiting for?

street (1)

Ponderings and images in response to Lost in Translation’s Thursday special.

 

Kiss. There are a lot of ways to capture a kiss, between two people – lovers, family, friends; two animals, or even just the sending or receiving of a kiss. I captured this kiss between two storks in Morocco. I felt lucky to have captured this moment.

In a new post specifically created for this challenge, share a picture which means KISS to you!

kiss

For this week’s photo challenge, I am resharing a post that tells the story of the loneliest whale in the world.  It is one of my earliest post and still touches my heart today for I believe her story is not unlike so many people today. It is unlikely that her story doesn’t resonate with many of us, young and old.  

In 2004, The New York Times wrote an article about how, since 1992, scientists have been tracking a baleen whale named, “The 52 Hertz Whale.”  She swims and sings alone in our earth’s vast ocean:

Not heard nor seen

She isn’t like any other baleen whale. Unlike all other whales, she doesn’t have friends. She doesn’t have a family. She doesn’t belong to any tribe, pack or gang. She doesn’t have a lover. She never had one.

Her songs come in groups of two to six calls, lasting for five to six seconds each. But her voice is unlike any other baleen whale. It is unique—while the rest of her kind communicate between 12 and 25hz, she sings at 52hz. You see, that’s precisely the problem. No other whales can hear her. Every one of her desperate calls to communicate remains unanswered. Each cry ignored. And, with every lonely song, she becomes sadder and more frustrated, her notes going deeper in despair as the years go by.

Apparently not only is her song indecipherable to other whales, she also doesn’t follow the typical migration pattern of its species, making it even less likely to connect with others.

Just imagine that massive mammal, floating alone and singing—too big to connect with any of the beings it passes, feeling paradoxically small in the vast stretches of empty, open ocean.

How many of us, because of our unique characteristics, walk alone on mother earth calling out for another, waiting for another?